Title

The Effects of Family‐of‐Origin Alcohol Abuse on the Self‐Perceived Communication Competence of the Children

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1080/08824090409359966

Abstract

This study compared the self‐perceived communication competency of children raised in a family where alcohol was abused and children raised in a family where alcohol was not abused. Results indicated that, in general, adult children of alcoholics perceive that they are less competent communicators than adult children of nonalcoholics; however, compared to male children of nonalcoholics, children of alcoholics perceive that they pretend to listen more and are more supportive and cooperative listeners. Contrary to prior research, results indicated no significant differences between male and female adult children of alcoholics with respect to their self‐perceived communication competence. Implications of these results are discussed with regards to how they reflect the environment of families where alcohol is abused.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Communication Research Reports, v. 21, issue 1, p. 47-59

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