Title

Adherence, Body Mass Index, and Depression in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The Mediational Role of Diabetes Symptoms and Self-Efficacy

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-2007

Keywords

adherence self-efficacy, BMI, depression, diabetes symptoms

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.26.6.693

Abstract

Objective: Evidence indicates that depression is linked to the development and worsening of diabetes, but the mechanisms underlying this link are not well understood. The authors examined the hypothesis that diabetes-related symptoms mediate the effect of both behavioral adherence and body mass index (BMI) on depression. In addition, they examined whether a prior finding that self-efficacy mediates the effect of behavioral adherence and BMI on depression would replicate with a larger sample size (W. P. Sacco, K. J. Wells, C. A. Vaughan, A. Friedman, S. Perez, & R. Morales, 2005). Also, the relative contributions of diabetes-related symptoms and self-efficacy to depression were evaluated. Design and Participants: Cross-sectional design involving adults diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes (N = 99). Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was depression (Patient Health Questionnaire: Nine Symptom Depression Checklist). Predictors of depression were diet and exercise adherence (Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire), diet and exercise self-efficacy (Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire), diabetes symptoms (Diabetes Symptom Checklist), and BMI (based on height and weight data from medical records). Results: Path and mediation analyses indicated that adherence and BMI each contributed to depression indirectly, via their effects on self-efficacy and diabetes-related medical symptoms. Conclusion: Results provide evidence consistent with two independent pathways by which BMI and adherence could increase depression in people with Type 2 diabetes. The first pathway indicates that the effects of higher BMI and poor adherence on depression are mediated by lower self-efficacy perceptions. The second pathway indicates that the effect of higher BMI on depression is mediated by increased diabetes symptoms.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Health Psychology, v. 26, issue 6, p. 693-700

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