Title

Occupational Stress and Gender: A Cross-cultural Study

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2000

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1002/1099-1700(200010)16:5<271::AID-SMI862>3.0.CO;2-G

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of gender and culture in managers' experiences of work stress. Data were collected on sources of occupational stress (stressors), coping and consequences of occupational stress (strains) from male and female managers from four countries—South Africa, the United Kingdom, United States of America and Taiwan. Few significant results were found for the interaction between country and gender on any of the measures. When the sample as a whole was examined, however, there were also virtually no differences in sources of work stress, but there were differences in the consequences of work stress for male and female managers. The implications of finding a lack of differences in sources of work stress for males and females combined with finding differences in strains for male and female managers are discussed.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Stress Medicine, v. 16, issue 5, p. 271-278

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