Title

Interactive Effects of Perceived Control and Job Stressors on Affective Reactions and Health Outcomes for Clerical Workers

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1987

Keywords

Control, job stress, satisfaction, health

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1080/02678378708258497

Abstract

Karasek's (1979) hypothesis that perceived control interacts with various job stressors in affecting employee satisfaction and health was tested. It was proposed that high levels of perceived stress would only be associated with poor health and negative affect in the presence of low control. One hundred and thirty-six clerical workers at a major US university completed questionnaries containing the measures of interest. The results of regression analyses failed to support the interaction hypothesis. However, measures related to both control and job stressors were found to correlate with satisfaction and health outcomes, as has been found in prior research. Limitations of the self-report and correlational methodology are discussed.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Work & Stress, v. 1, issue 2, p. 155-162

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