Title

Perceived Control by Employees: A Meta-Analysis of Studies Concerning Autonomy and Participation at Work

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1986

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1177/001872678603901104

Abstract

Perceived control by employees is a variable that has been heavily researched in two popular areas, job design (as autonomy) and participative decision-making. A meta-analysis was conducted of studies relating perceived control variables to 19 employee outcome variables. For all studies combined, it was found that high levels of perceived control was associated with high levels of job satisfaction (overall and individual facets), commitment, involvement, performance and motivation, and low levels of physical symptoms, emotional distress, role stress, absenteeism, intent to turnover, and turnover. A similar pattern was found for the autonomy and participation studies analyzed separately, with one exception. Participative decision-making was not associated with absenteeism in the single study available.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Human Relations, v. 39, issue 11, p. 1005-1016

Share

COinS