Title

Event-Related Brain Potentials: A Tool in the Study of Human Information Processing

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1979

Keywords

Event Related Potential, P300 Amplitude, P300 Component, P300 Latency, Clinical Neurophysiology

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-3462-0_2

Abstract

A cognitive psychologist of note who is not particularly impressed with event-related potentials (ERPs) commented recently, while reviewing a grant application, that studies of the behavioral correlates of ERPs can be described as studies in which “phenomena are in search of a theory.” The intent was pejorative, but I found the statement complimentary. I was especially pleased because several years ago in a review of one of my own proposals another referee suggested that in the field of ERPs “one sees a technique futilely searching for phenomena!” We have, it would seem, made good progress in the last decade if we have found phenomena and are now searching for a theory. A detailed review of this progress is presented by Callaway, Tueting, and Koslow (in press).

Was this content written or created while at USF?

No

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Event-Related Brain Potentials: A Tool in the Study of Human Information Processing, in H. Begleiter (Ed.), Evoked Potentials and Behavior, New York: Plenum Press, p. 13-75.

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