Title

Perception of Teasing in Underweight Persons; A Modification of the Perception of Teasing Scale

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2004

Keywords

Teasing, Body image, Underweight

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1007%2FBF03325058

Abstract

The psychometric properties of the Perception of Teasing Scale-Underweight, a modified version of the Perception of Teasing Scale (1), were examined. One hundred eightythree college students (81 male; 102 female; age range 17–57 years) completed questionnaires about underweight-related and competency-related teasing experiences, eating attitudes, body image, self-esteem, and mood. Factor analysis suggested the Perception of Teasing Scale-Underweight has a two-factor structure, measuring both underweight-related and competency-related teasing experiences. Significant correlations (p<0.05) were found between the Perception of Teasing Scale-Underweight, Beck Depression Inventory, Fear of Negative Appearance Evaluation Scale, Multidimentional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales, Multiaxial Eating Disorder Scale, Social Physique Anxiety Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The pattern of correlations differed between the entire sample and those with a body mass index <21. One-way analysis of variance analyses found significant differences (p<0.05) between those with body mass index (BMI) <21 and those with BMI >21 for the weight-related event and weight-related impact scales, indicating that the measure discriminates between those individuals most likely to have been underweight as adolescents versus those most likely to have been normal weight or overweight. This measure provides a sound psychometric tool for examining underweight-related and competency-related teasing experiences. The impact of appearance and competence related teasing in underweight persons is less well understood than in overweight samples; therefore, future work should be conducted with a more underweight sample to bridge this gap in the literature.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, v. 9, issue 2, p. 139-146

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