Title

Gender and Sex Role Differences in the Perception of Social Support

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1986

Keywords

Social Support, Social Psychology, Stress Level, Emotional Support, Social Participation

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00287449

Abstract

This study examined the relationships among support types (i.e., emotional, instrumental, and nonintimate social participation), gender, sex role orientation, and stress level among college undergraduates (N=253). Dependent variables included need, perceived availability, and satisfaction with support. Sex differences were found only in emotional support, with men reporting less need, perceived availability, and marginally less satisfaction than women. The only gender by sex role interaction was on need for emotional support. Traditional sex-typed men reported less need than traditional women, whereas there was no difference between androgynous men and women. While sex differences do exist for emotional support, the effects of sex role orientation on perceptions of social support appears to be somewhat circumscribed.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Sex Roles, v. 14, issues 9-10, p. 481-499

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