Title

Optimism, Coping, and Long-Term Recovery from Coronary Artery Surgery in Women

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1998

Keywords

optimism, coping strategies, outcomes, coronary artery surgery, women

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1098-240X(199802)21:1<15::AID-NUR3>3.0.CO;2-W

Abstract

Optimism, coping strategies, and psychological and functional outcomes were measured in 55 women undergoing coronary artery surgery. Data were collected in‐hospital and at 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Optimism was related to positive moods and life satisfaction, and inversely related to negative moods. Few relationships were found between optimism and functional ability. Cognitive coping strategies accounted for a mediating effect between optimism and negative mood. Optimists were more likely to accept their situation, and less likely to use escapism. In turn, these coping strategies were inversely related to negative mood and mediated the relationship between optimism and this outcome. Optimism was not related to problem‐focused coping strategies; thus, these coping strategies cannot explain the relationship between optimism and outcomes.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

No

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Research in Nursing & Health, v. 21, issue 1, p. 15-26

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