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Most Popular Papers *

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Fifty years of cave arthropod sampling: techniques and best practices
J. Judson Wynne, Francis G. Howarth, Stefan Sommer, and Brett G. Dickson

  • 110 papers examined (from 1967 - 2018) to explore how cave-dwelling invertebrates were sampled
  • A summary of techniques most commonly applied and appropriateness of these techniques is provided
  • Nearly one-half of the studies applied systematic techniques
  • Few papers provided enough information to repeat the study
  • Inconsistencies in sampling techniques nomenclature observed

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A world review of fungi, yeasts, and slime molds in caves
Karen J. Vanderwolf, David Malloch, Donald F. McAlpine, and Graham J. Forbes

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ISOLUTION 1.0: an ISOtope evoLUTION model describing the stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope values of speleothems
Michael Deininger and Denis Scholz

  • A speleothem proxy system model for stable oxygen and carbon isotopes
  • Modeling of disequilibrium isotope fractionation processes in speleothems
  • Modeling of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes in dependence on cave parameters

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Underground dinosaur tracksite inside a karst of southern France: Early Jurassic tridactyl traces from the Dolomitic Formation of the Malaval Cave (Lozère)
Jean-David Moreau, Vincent Trincal, Daniel André, Louis Baret, Alain Jacquet, and Michel Wienin

  • Hettangian tridactyl dinosaur tracks were discovered in the Malaval Cave (southern France)
  • The tracksite was studied using photogrammetric imaging technique
  • More than 26 footprints of theropods were identified
  • The depositional environment varied from subtidal to intertidal/supratidal flat marsh
  • This work highlights the great interest to heighten palaeoichnological prospections in karsts

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Sulfur Cave (Romania), an extreme environment with microbial mats in a CO2-H2S/O2 gas chemocline dominated by mycobacteria
Serban M. Sarbu, Joost W. Aerts, Jean-François Flot, Rob J.M. Van Spanning, Calin Baciu, Artur Ionescu, Boglárka M. Kis, Reka Incze, Sándor Sikó-Barabási, Zoltan Para, Botond Hegyeli, Nicu-Viorel Atudorei, Casey Barr, Kenneth Nealson, Ferenc L. Forray, Cristian Lascu, Emily J. Fleming, Wilbert Bitter, and Radu Popa

  • Sulfur Cave (Romania) is fed by mofettic emissions of CO2, CH4, H2S, and water vapors
  • A redox gas chemocline (i.e. oxic/anoxic gas/gas interface) occurs in Sulfur Cave
  • Microbial biofilms colonize the cave walls at the gas/gas interface
  • Below the interface, rich deposits of twinned and elongated sulfur crystals are found
  • Sulfur Cave biofilms are important in the search for life in extreme environments

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» Updated as of 02/16/19.