Title

Age and Racial Disparities in Substance Use and Self-Reported Viral Suppression among Men who have Sex with Men with HIV

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2018

Keywords

Substance use, race, age, HIV, viral suppression

Abstract

HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM). Substance use is common among people living with HIV and may affect antiretroviral therapy adherence. Nevertheless, research examining the association between substance use and viral suppression is lacking. The aims of this study were to determine the association between substance use and self-reported viral suppression, and by age and race among MSM living with HIV. Data were obtained from 309 HIV-positive MSM. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between substance use and self-reported viral suppression at baseline, and by age and race. Approximately 67% of participants reported they were virally suppressed. After adjusting for sociodemographics, every increase in substance use score was associated with a 7% decrease in the odds of reporting viral suppression (odds ratio [OR]: 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.98; p = 0.003). The negative association between substance use and self-reported viral suppression remained statistically significant among MSM aged 25–34 years (OR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.79–1.00; p = 0.041) and statistically significant for Black MSM (OR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.86–0.98; p = 0.009). Intervention programs for MSM living with HIV aimed at improving viral suppression should address substance use and consider the differences by age and race.

Citation / Publisher Attribution

International Journal of STD & AIDS, v. 29, issue 12, p. 1174-1182

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