Title

The Utility of Stable and Radioisotopes in Fish Tissues as Biogeochemical Tracers of Marine Oil Spill Food Web Effects

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2020

Keywords

Petrocarbon, Reef fish, Stable isotopes, Radiocarbon

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org//10.1007/978-3-030-12963-7_13

Abstract

Direct exposure to petroleum compounds was widely reported for a variety of taxa following the DWH. Evidence of exposure ranged from oiling of skin, shells, or feathers, depending on the taxa, to observation of ingested oil in small translucent, invertebrates, to biomarkers of petroleum compounds within an organism’s tissues, such as PAHs in the hepatopancreas of invertebrates or the liver of fishes, or metabolic products of PAH catabolism in the bile of various vertebrate taxa. Development of natural biogeochemical tracers to examine indirect effects, especially over long (months to years) time scales, can be much more problematic. In this chapter, we describe the utility of employing stable isotopes and radioisotopes to 1) examine whether food web effects can be inferred from shifts in stable isotope values measured in vertebrate taxa; 2) examine the assimilation and trophic transfer of petrocarbon in marine food webs; and, 3) serve as long-term biogeochemical tracers either of petrocarbon assimilation or trophic shifts that are indicative of food web effects of marine oil spills. Data and analyses are largely drawn from DWH-related studies but with broader implications to marine oil spills in general.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

The Utility of Stable and Radioisotopes in Fish Tissues as Biogeochemical Tracers of Marine Oil Spill Food Web Effects, in S. A. Murawski, C. H. Ainsworth, S. Gilbert, D. J. Hollander, C. B. Paris, M. Schlüter & D. L. Wetzel (Eds.), Scenarios and Responses to Future Deep Oil Spills: Fighting the Next War, Springer, p. 219-238

Share

COinS