Title

Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Bottom Sediments and Depositional Processes: A Baseline for Future Oil Spills

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2020

Keywords

Sediments, Geochronology, Sedimentary processes

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org//10.1007/978-3-030-12963-7_5

Abstract

The deposition/accumulation of oil on the seafloor is heavily influenced by sediment/texture/composition and sedimentary processes/accumulation rates. The objective of this chapter is to provide a baseline of Gulf of Mexico sediment types and transport/depositional processes to help guide managers where oiled sediments may be expected to be deposited and potentially accumulate on the seafloor in the event of a future oil spill. Based solely on sediments/processes/accumulation rates, regions most vulnerable to oil deposition/accumulation include the deep eastern basin, followed by the western/southwestern basin, and north and west continental margins. The least vulnerable regions include the northwest Cuban shelf and the carbonate-dominated west Florida shelf and Campeche Bank. This is intended to be used as a general, “first cut” tool and does not consider local variations in sediments/processes.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Bottom Sediments and Depositional Processes: A Baseline for Future Oil Spills, in S. A. Murawski, C. H. Ainsworth, S. Gilbert, D. J. Hollander, C. B. Paris, M. Schlüter and D. L. Wetzel (Eds.), Scenarios and Responses to Future Deep Oil Spills: Fighting the Next War, Springer, p. 75-95

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