Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Continuous Electrowetting via Electrochemical Diodes

Abstract

Precisely moving small amounts of fluid is vital to the function of many new technologies, including Lab-on-a-chip devices, new display technology, microlenses, and more. In particular, Lab-on-a-chip devices have the potential
to transform clinical analysis by offering a compact, inexpensive, and disposable method for carrying out many laboratory functions at the point of care. While current methods exist to transport droplets, they can be complex,
both in terms of their manufacture and operation. We present a novel method for micro- scale fluid transport which takes advantage of the current-rectifying properties of valve metals in combination with electrowetting on dielectric
(EWOD) effects. In addition, our device is simple to operate and requires only a single photolithographic step to manufacture. By asymmetrically reducing the contact angle of a droplet, using electrochemical diodes, we are able to
induce continuous linear motion in a 40 μl droplet across at 28 mm silicon electrode at velocities up to 32mm/s. In this poster we examine a device based on this method and in particular evaluate the effects that differing valve metals and electrolytic fluids have on performance.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Nathan Crane

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Continuous Electrowetting via Electrochemical Diodes

Precisely moving small amounts of fluid is vital to the function of many new technologies, including Lab-on-a-chip devices, new display technology, microlenses, and more. In particular, Lab-on-a-chip devices have the potential
to transform clinical analysis by offering a compact, inexpensive, and disposable method for carrying out many laboratory functions at the point of care. While current methods exist to transport droplets, they can be complex,
both in terms of their manufacture and operation. We present a novel method for micro- scale fluid transport which takes advantage of the current-rectifying properties of valve metals in combination with electrowetting on dielectric
(EWOD) effects. In addition, our device is simple to operate and requires only a single photolithographic step to manufacture. By asymmetrically reducing the contact angle of a droplet, using electrochemical diodes, we are able to
induce continuous linear motion in a 40 μl droplet across at 28 mm silicon electrode at velocities up to 32mm/s. In this poster we examine a device based on this method and in particular evaluate the effects that differing valve metals and electrolytic fluids have on performance.