Presentation Type

Poster

Presenter Information

Scott F. Muir, USF WAMI GroupFollow

Title of Abstract

Radiometric Sensors as a Non-invasive Approach to Health Monitoring

Abstract

“Radiometric Sensors as a Non-invasive Approach to Health Monitoring”

Author: Scott F Muir

(University of South Florida WAMI Research Group)

In the healthcare industry, the ability to monitor the health of patients in real time has become a major focus to ensure proper and quality treatment; an example of one of the preferred methods for achieving this goal involves non-invasive health monitoring. The objective of this research involves the use of a total power radiometer for non-invasive monitoring of core body temperature. For this research, the radiometer will be used to monitor various tissue phantoms in order to detect simulated physiological anomalies known to be correlated with a temperature increase; these anomalies will be provided by heating elements that will be attached to a printed circuit board and placed beneath the phantoms. The design of the circuit board will include more than one heating element to provide a realistic heat signature of a person. When the desired temperatures have been reached, the radiometer will scan across the phantom to generate thermal images.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Thomas Weller

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Radiometric Sensors as a Non-invasive Approach to Health Monitoring

“Radiometric Sensors as a Non-invasive Approach to Health Monitoring”

Author: Scott F Muir

(University of South Florida WAMI Research Group)

In the healthcare industry, the ability to monitor the health of patients in real time has become a major focus to ensure proper and quality treatment; an example of one of the preferred methods for achieving this goal involves non-invasive health monitoring. The objective of this research involves the use of a total power radiometer for non-invasive monitoring of core body temperature. For this research, the radiometer will be used to monitor various tissue phantoms in order to detect simulated physiological anomalies known to be correlated with a temperature increase; these anomalies will be provided by heating elements that will be attached to a printed circuit board and placed beneath the phantoms. The design of the circuit board will include more than one heating element to provide a realistic heat signature of a person. When the desired temperatures have been reached, the radiometer will scan across the phantom to generate thermal images.