Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Application of Tin Nanoparticles Modified Interdigitated Microelectrodes for Room Temperature Hydrogen Sensing

Abstract

Hydrogen (H2) is considered being a renewable and environmentally-friendly fuel for emerging energy needs. However, the threat of H2 leaks continues to be a major challenge as hydrogen in 4%–75% range can cause an explosion. Thus, there is a need for reliable and fast response sensors. Recently, momentum has shifted to room temperature sensing of hydrogen to enhance safety. Nanomaterials, known for higher catalytic and faster response than their bulk counterpart, have shown promise for room temperature hydrogen detection. This work seeks to investigate the behavior of Tin Nanoparticles (SnNP’s) and thin film of tin towards room temperature hydrogen sensing. Films of SnNP’s and tin were prepared on interdigitated micro electrodes (IDµE) by solution casting and thermal evaporation, respectively were tested in real time in 0-3% range of hydrogen. The sensor showed an increase in resistivity changes with increasing percentages of hydrogen. Further, it was found to be selective against carbon dioxide. Initial results indicated that films of SnNP’s on IDµE chips exhibit better response at room temperature and reveal fast response and higher sensitivity compared to tin films. Further experiments are under progress to optimize SnNP’s amount in thin layer for optimum response and results will presented during symposium.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Sunil K. Arya

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Application of Tin Nanoparticles Modified Interdigitated Microelectrodes for Room Temperature Hydrogen Sensing

Hydrogen (H2) is considered being a renewable and environmentally-friendly fuel for emerging energy needs. However, the threat of H2 leaks continues to be a major challenge as hydrogen in 4%–75% range can cause an explosion. Thus, there is a need for reliable and fast response sensors. Recently, momentum has shifted to room temperature sensing of hydrogen to enhance safety. Nanomaterials, known for higher catalytic and faster response than their bulk counterpart, have shown promise for room temperature hydrogen detection. This work seeks to investigate the behavior of Tin Nanoparticles (SnNP’s) and thin film of tin towards room temperature hydrogen sensing. Films of SnNP’s and tin were prepared on interdigitated micro electrodes (IDµE) by solution casting and thermal evaporation, respectively were tested in real time in 0-3% range of hydrogen. The sensor showed an increase in resistivity changes with increasing percentages of hydrogen. Further, it was found to be selective against carbon dioxide. Initial results indicated that films of SnNP’s on IDµE chips exhibit better response at room temperature and reveal fast response and higher sensitivity compared to tin films. Further experiments are under progress to optimize SnNP’s amount in thin layer for optimum response and results will presented during symposium.