Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Preserving Fertility: The Development of an Informational Brochure for Pediatric Oncology Patients

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Many patients diagnosed with cancer are unaware that treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation may have detrimental effects on future reproductive abilities. To raise awareness about options for preserving fertility among pediatric oncology patients, researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with All Children’s Hospital to develop an educational brochure. METHODS: Individual interviews were conducted with teenage cancer patients, parents, and physicians. Participants were shown two brochures for females and two for males, then asked to evaluate the aesthetic quality of the brochures, as well as the clarity and helpfulness of the content.
RESULTS: Teen cancer patients and their parents tended to have similar perceptions of the brochures, but a few disparities in opinion were apparent. Parents considered the terminology too advanced, while the teens held that it was understandable and necessary. Parents commonly suggested the addition of age ranges, cost information, and resources about adoption agencies to the brochures. Physicians recommended that the content be more “empowering,” stressing hopefulness after treatment.
CONCLUSION: These findings enabled the successful production of a brochure which promotes awareness about fertility preservation options for pediatric oncology patients. Future efforts will focus on examining the pamphlet’s impact on generating discussion about future fertility preservation options.

Categories

Behavioral Sciences

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Ph.D.

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Preserving Fertility: The Development of an Informational Brochure for Pediatric Oncology Patients

INTRODUCTION: Many patients diagnosed with cancer are unaware that treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation may have detrimental effects on future reproductive abilities. To raise awareness about options for preserving fertility among pediatric oncology patients, researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with All Children’s Hospital to develop an educational brochure. METHODS: Individual interviews were conducted with teenage cancer patients, parents, and physicians. Participants were shown two brochures for females and two for males, then asked to evaluate the aesthetic quality of the brochures, as well as the clarity and helpfulness of the content.
RESULTS: Teen cancer patients and their parents tended to have similar perceptions of the brochures, but a few disparities in opinion were apparent. Parents considered the terminology too advanced, while the teens held that it was understandable and necessary. Parents commonly suggested the addition of age ranges, cost information, and resources about adoption agencies to the brochures. Physicians recommended that the content be more “empowering,” stressing hopefulness after treatment.
CONCLUSION: These findings enabled the successful production of a brochure which promotes awareness about fertility preservation options for pediatric oncology patients. Future efforts will focus on examining the pamphlet’s impact on generating discussion about future fertility preservation options.