Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Psychological Responses to Varying Intensities During Treadmill Trials of Similar Work

Abstract

PURPOSE: Evaluate rate of perceived exertion (RPE) responses as intensity is varied in 10-minute increments throughout an exercise bout. METHODS: Participants completed an aerobic fitness test to determine VO2max. Five randomized 30-minute treadmill trials followed, each differing in variation of intensity throughout but equivalent in distance and work. The first maintained steady intensity, the second increased in intensity over time, the third decreased in intensity over time, the fourth peaked in the middle, and the fifth decreased in the middle. Intensity is prescribed as a percentage of ventilatory threshold. RPE and heart rate were assessed pre-exercise, at five-minute intervals during exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 15 minutes following exercise. RESULTS: Data analysis utilized ANOVA and pairwise comparisons. Anticipated RPE was significantly lower for the steady-rate trial when compared with the trial that peaked in the middle. Post-exercise RPE was significantly lower following the steady-rate trial when compared to the trial that increased throughout and peaked at the end. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that varying intensities within exercise trials may impact RPE during exercise and post-exercise. More research is needed and a larger, more diverse sample to further define the relationship between varied exertion during exercise and perceptions of exercise after completion.

Categories

Interdisciplinary

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Marcus Kilpatrick

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Psychological Responses to Varying Intensities During Treadmill Trials of Similar Work

PURPOSE: Evaluate rate of perceived exertion (RPE) responses as intensity is varied in 10-minute increments throughout an exercise bout. METHODS: Participants completed an aerobic fitness test to determine VO2max. Five randomized 30-minute treadmill trials followed, each differing in variation of intensity throughout but equivalent in distance and work. The first maintained steady intensity, the second increased in intensity over time, the third decreased in intensity over time, the fourth peaked in the middle, and the fifth decreased in the middle. Intensity is prescribed as a percentage of ventilatory threshold. RPE and heart rate were assessed pre-exercise, at five-minute intervals during exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 15 minutes following exercise. RESULTS: Data analysis utilized ANOVA and pairwise comparisons. Anticipated RPE was significantly lower for the steady-rate trial when compared with the trial that peaked in the middle. Post-exercise RPE was significantly lower following the steady-rate trial when compared to the trial that increased throughout and peaked at the end. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that varying intensities within exercise trials may impact RPE during exercise and post-exercise. More research is needed and a larger, more diverse sample to further define the relationship between varied exertion during exercise and perceptions of exercise after completion.