Presentation Type

Poster

Presenter Information

Daniel GomezFollow

Title of Abstract

Spray deposition of bio-sensor substrates

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to develop a rapid technique for the fabrication of bio-assays, which has shown similar or better results than the standard wet chemistry technique currently used. The technique consists of the direct deposition of an antibodies aqueous solution on a glass surface using a pneumatic spray method without any adhesion chemistry. The first phase of the project involves optimizing the parameters in order to achieve maximum performance of the experiment at minimum antibody consumption. The experimental results and surface analysis indicate that a homogeneous antibody coating over the glass was achieved. Through the standardization of this method, the reproducibility of the results was confirmed. The final phase of the project involves testing the sensitivity to Escherichia coli bacteria and comparing the accuracy of the results to that of the conventional wet chemistry method. By demonstrating that the shelf life of our samples is similar to the samples prepared by wet chemistry, we show that our pneumatic technique is competitive. The development of this technique allows a fast detection of the concentration of environmental pollutants and monitors the presence of the bacteria.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Rudy Schlaf

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Spray deposition of bio-sensor substrates

The purpose of this research is to develop a rapid technique for the fabrication of bio-assays, which has shown similar or better results than the standard wet chemistry technique currently used. The technique consists of the direct deposition of an antibodies aqueous solution on a glass surface using a pneumatic spray method without any adhesion chemistry. The first phase of the project involves optimizing the parameters in order to achieve maximum performance of the experiment at minimum antibody consumption. The experimental results and surface analysis indicate that a homogeneous antibody coating over the glass was achieved. Through the standardization of this method, the reproducibility of the results was confirmed. The final phase of the project involves testing the sensitivity to Escherichia coli bacteria and comparing the accuracy of the results to that of the conventional wet chemistry method. By demonstrating that the shelf life of our samples is similar to the samples prepared by wet chemistry, we show that our pneumatic technique is competitive. The development of this technique allows a fast detection of the concentration of environmental pollutants and monitors the presence of the bacteria.