Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Predictors of Perceived Oral Health Needs and Service Utilization among Florida Medicaid Enrollees

Abstract

Oral health can be defined as “encompassing all the immunologic, sensory, neuromuscular and structural functions of the mouth and craniofacial complex.” (Mouradian, 2001). However, Coughlin, et al., (2005) noted that Medicaid beneficiaries held the greatest unmet need for dental care, as compared to privately insured individuals. This gap suggests that Medicaid enrollees face barriers in accessibility to oral health care. The purpose of our study was to approximate the frequency of self-perceived oral health needs among Medicaid-enrolled adults and to identify demographic (6) and clinical (5) variables predicative of enrollees’ self-reported oral health needs. The study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from 1,721 Medicaid enrollees who responded to the Florida Health Services Survey between 2000 and 2005 and from Medicaid administrative service utilization data. The results suggest that age, education level, health status, mental health status, substance abuse status, functional status, and receipt of supplemental security income were predictive of oral health needs. The full presentation will expand on these findings as well as summarize the service utilization and costs results.

Categories

Behavioral Sciences

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Roger Boothroyd

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Predictors of Perceived Oral Health Needs and Service Utilization among Florida Medicaid Enrollees

Oral health can be defined as “encompassing all the immunologic, sensory, neuromuscular and structural functions of the mouth and craniofacial complex.” (Mouradian, 2001). However, Coughlin, et al., (2005) noted that Medicaid beneficiaries held the greatest unmet need for dental care, as compared to privately insured individuals. This gap suggests that Medicaid enrollees face barriers in accessibility to oral health care. The purpose of our study was to approximate the frequency of self-perceived oral health needs among Medicaid-enrolled adults and to identify demographic (6) and clinical (5) variables predicative of enrollees’ self-reported oral health needs. The study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from 1,721 Medicaid enrollees who responded to the Florida Health Services Survey between 2000 and 2005 and from Medicaid administrative service utilization data. The results suggest that age, education level, health status, mental health status, substance abuse status, functional status, and receipt of supplemental security income were predictive of oral health needs. The full presentation will expand on these findings as well as summarize the service utilization and costs results.