Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Palladium and Nickel Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Decomposition

Abstract

The increasing need for renewable energy has lead to the development of catalysts composed of a wide variety of different metals and metal oxides. In our studies, we have investigated various aspects of Pd and Ni catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition, which is an important part of biomass gasification and its subsequent cleanup. In one set of experiments, we synthesize size-controlled Pd nanoparticles via a polyol synthesis to study size-related phenomena of methane reforming. The size of Pd nanocrystals is controlled by the ratio of Pd precursors used in because the Pd2+ nucleates faster than Pd4+. In the second part, we characterize, by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, alumina-supported Ni catalysts as a function of time-on-stream and regenerations to better understand the deactivation phenomena. Our analyses suggest both sulfur poisoning and solid-state reactions between Ni and alumina occur to form less active materials.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Thesis

Mentor Information

Dr. John Kuhn

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Palladium and Nickel Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Decomposition

The increasing need for renewable energy has lead to the development of catalysts composed of a wide variety of different metals and metal oxides. In our studies, we have investigated various aspects of Pd and Ni catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition, which is an important part of biomass gasification and its subsequent cleanup. In one set of experiments, we synthesize size-controlled Pd nanoparticles via a polyol synthesis to study size-related phenomena of methane reforming. The size of Pd nanocrystals is controlled by the ratio of Pd precursors used in because the Pd2+ nucleates faster than Pd4+. In the second part, we characterize, by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, alumina-supported Ni catalysts as a function of time-on-stream and regenerations to better understand the deactivation phenomena. Our analyses suggest both sulfur poisoning and solid-state reactions between Ni and alumina occur to form less active materials.