Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Identifying LRRK2 expression cell culture model for the study of Parkinson’s Disease

Abstract

Mutations to the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is a common cause of both autosomal dominant familial and spontaneous Parkinson’s dsease (PD) cases. Researchers are unable to produce highly pure and active LRRK2, due to the large size and complexity of the LRRK2 protein, preventing advanced drug development for PD. Currently available cell culture models for LRRK2 are either primary neuronal cell cultures, which require fresh brain samples each time, or transiently recombinant LRRK2 transfected cells. Our goal is to identify a stable cell culture model for LRRK2 from a series of available cell lines, including neuronal cells from humans (M17 cells) and mice (N2A cells), and non-neuronal cells (eg. human embryonic kidney 293 [HEK] cells). Cell lysates will be analyzed for LRRK2 levels by Western Blots, utilizing LRRK2 antibodies and chemiluminescence. We expect that among these cells screened for LRRK2 expression, one or more cell lines will have detectable expression levels. Cell lines that are identified with high levels of LRRK2 will provide researchers a novel in-vitro model for drug discovery as well as mechanistic insight into Parkinson’s disease.

Categories

Biomedical Sciences

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Professor Umesh K. Jinwal

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Identifying LRRK2 expression cell culture model for the study of Parkinson’s Disease

Mutations to the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is a common cause of both autosomal dominant familial and spontaneous Parkinson’s dsease (PD) cases. Researchers are unable to produce highly pure and active LRRK2, due to the large size and complexity of the LRRK2 protein, preventing advanced drug development for PD. Currently available cell culture models for LRRK2 are either primary neuronal cell cultures, which require fresh brain samples each time, or transiently recombinant LRRK2 transfected cells. Our goal is to identify a stable cell culture model for LRRK2 from a series of available cell lines, including neuronal cells from humans (M17 cells) and mice (N2A cells), and non-neuronal cells (eg. human embryonic kidney 293 [HEK] cells). Cell lysates will be analyzed for LRRK2 levels by Western Blots, utilizing LRRK2 antibodies and chemiluminescence. We expect that among these cells screened for LRRK2 expression, one or more cell lines will have detectable expression levels. Cell lines that are identified with high levels of LRRK2 will provide researchers a novel in-vitro model for drug discovery as well as mechanistic insight into Parkinson’s disease.