Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Studies on the removal of Lissamine Green B (LGB) from soil in comparison with contemporary approaches

Abstract

Studies on the removal of Lissamine Green B (LGB) from soil in comparison with contemporary approaches. N. NABAR and D.F. MARTIN. Vast amounts of chemical dyes (around 106 tons) are made annually worldwide. Dye effluents can make their way into runoff and wastewater, eventually settling in the soil. Previous extraction methods have had limited success in removal from soil, and a recent approach involved the use of Fenton’s reagent with electrochemistry (Rosales et al., J. Environ Sci. Hlth. 2009, 44, 1104-1111). We examined the efficacy of dye removal using a kaolin-clay model for soil and Lissamine Green B (LGB) dye. The removal of LGB from a LGB/kaolin mixture was recorded after a 24- and 48- hour extraction with hot water using a Soxhlet apparatus. Previously, aqueous Lissamine B removal was achieved using column chromatography with commercially available Octolig®, a polyethyldiamine molecule attached to a high surface area silica gel (Chang et al., Tech. Innov, 2010, 12 71-1277). The results indicated complete removal of LGB from kaolin using 24-hour Soxhlet extractions. Removal of dyes using hot water and/or chromatography with Octolig® could provide a potential safe, large-scale solution to treating soils contaminated with dyes or other organics with suitable functional groups.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Thesis

Mentor Information

Dr. Dean Martin

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Studies on the removal of Lissamine Green B (LGB) from soil in comparison with contemporary approaches

Studies on the removal of Lissamine Green B (LGB) from soil in comparison with contemporary approaches. N. NABAR and D.F. MARTIN. Vast amounts of chemical dyes (around 106 tons) are made annually worldwide. Dye effluents can make their way into runoff and wastewater, eventually settling in the soil. Previous extraction methods have had limited success in removal from soil, and a recent approach involved the use of Fenton’s reagent with electrochemistry (Rosales et al., J. Environ Sci. Hlth. 2009, 44, 1104-1111). We examined the efficacy of dye removal using a kaolin-clay model for soil and Lissamine Green B (LGB) dye. The removal of LGB from a LGB/kaolin mixture was recorded after a 24- and 48- hour extraction with hot water using a Soxhlet apparatus. Previously, aqueous Lissamine B removal was achieved using column chromatography with commercially available Octolig®, a polyethyldiamine molecule attached to a high surface area silica gel (Chang et al., Tech. Innov, 2010, 12 71-1277). The results indicated complete removal of LGB from kaolin using 24-hour Soxhlet extractions. Removal of dyes using hot water and/or chromatography with Octolig® could provide a potential safe, large-scale solution to treating soils contaminated with dyes or other organics with suitable functional groups.