Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Cyber Security Policy-Making in Local Government: An Analysis of Threats, Preparedness, and Bureaucratic Roadblocks to Success

Abstract

Cyber security is an issue growing in prominence at all levels of government, especially in light of recent high-profile leaks. Yet while the cyber security challenges facing state and federal governments are well-known, the issue at the local level is far less researched. Local governments must protect sensitive and private information about their citizens and activities, but bureaucratic barriers often change this necessity into a luxury many departments cannot afford. Local governments face both strapped budgets and cyber security mandates from above, and the cyber security landscape is ever-changing with new threats and challenges. Given these threats and barriers, how can local governments best manage cyber security policy? This probative study, based on a statewide survey of Floridian county officials conducted in spring of 2010, hopes to answer that question. The research assesses the degree to which threats to a department’s cyber security have encouraged the adoption and execution of security policies and the degree to which specific bureaucratic roadblocks hamper preparedness efforts.

Categories

Social Sciences

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Susan MacManus

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Cyber Security Policy-Making in Local Government: An Analysis of Threats, Preparedness, and Bureaucratic Roadblocks to Success

Cyber security is an issue growing in prominence at all levels of government, especially in light of recent high-profile leaks. Yet while the cyber security challenges facing state and federal governments are well-known, the issue at the local level is far less researched. Local governments must protect sensitive and private information about their citizens and activities, but bureaucratic barriers often change this necessity into a luxury many departments cannot afford. Local governments face both strapped budgets and cyber security mandates from above, and the cyber security landscape is ever-changing with new threats and challenges. Given these threats and barriers, how can local governments best manage cyber security policy? This probative study, based on a statewide survey of Floridian county officials conducted in spring of 2010, hopes to answer that question. The research assesses the degree to which threats to a department’s cyber security have encouraged the adoption and execution of security policies and the degree to which specific bureaucratic roadblocks hamper preparedness efforts.