Presentation Type

Poster

Title of Abstract

Can an intervention for adolescent cannabis users be adapted for use with adult females addicted to prescription narcotics?

Abstract

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Behavioral health service providers are increasingly facing pressures to implement interventions with proven effectiveness. As the push towards universal implementation of evidence-based practices increases, so does the need to evaluate the manner in which these therapies are delivered in real world settings. To this end, “fidelity assessment” is a quality control or process evaluation procedure designed to monitor the extent to which a particular intervention is delivered as intended. Motivational enhancement therapy / cognitive behavioral therapy (MET/CBT 12) is a twelve-session, manualized behavioral health intervention that has proven effective for treatment of adolescents with cannabis use disorders. This study assessed whether the MET/CBT 12 intervention could be adapted for use with adult females addicted to prescription narcotics, while still being administered with fidelity. Two independent evaluators used the MET/CBT 12 Adherence Scale to monitor the fidelity of the intervention delivered by two separate therapists. Results indicated that the intervention was consistently implemented with a high degree of fidelity by both therapists across multiple treatment sessions.

Categories

Behavioral Sciences

Research Type

Course Related

Mentor Information

M.Scott Young PhD

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Can an intervention for adolescent cannabis users be adapted for use with adult females addicted to prescription narcotics?

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Behavioral health service providers are increasingly facing pressures to implement interventions with proven effectiveness. As the push towards universal implementation of evidence-based practices increases, so does the need to evaluate the manner in which these therapies are delivered in real world settings. To this end, “fidelity assessment” is a quality control or process evaluation procedure designed to monitor the extent to which a particular intervention is delivered as intended. Motivational enhancement therapy / cognitive behavioral therapy (MET/CBT 12) is a twelve-session, manualized behavioral health intervention that has proven effective for treatment of adolescents with cannabis use disorders. This study assessed whether the MET/CBT 12 intervention could be adapted for use with adult females addicted to prescription narcotics, while still being administered with fidelity. Two independent evaluators used the MET/CBT 12 Adherence Scale to monitor the fidelity of the intervention delivered by two separate therapists. Results indicated that the intervention was consistently implemented with a high degree of fidelity by both therapists across multiple treatment sessions.