Presentation Type

Poster

Presenter Information

Joel R. CooperFollow

Title of Abstract

Surface Chemistry Gradient for Combinatorial Biomaterial Studies

Abstract

A profound understanding of cell-material communications is imperative to progress in the field of tissue engineering. Manufacture of combinatorial biomaterials that enable high throughput data processing is an attractive proposal in this regard. The immediate focus is to obtain gradients in surface energy using ultraviolet-ozone-oxidation (UVO). Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of n-octyldimethylchlorosilane (ODMS) were obtained on plasma cleaned glass slides. Significant effort went toward developing a virtual instrument in LabVIEW that specifically modulated the extent of UVO of SAMs by controlling the movement of the linear motion of the sample beneath the lamp. Water contact angle was used to characterize the resulting surface energy gradient. Initially, ODMS rendered the surface of the glass hydrophobic as confirmed by contact angle measurement (102°). As the sample was accelerated under a slit aperture UVO lamp, dose dependent oxidation of the SAM correlated with changes in contact angle. Following UVO exposure, the substrate exhibited a gradient in surface energy spanning a range in contact angle of 50° (hydrophilic) to 102° (hydrophobic) corresponding to maximum and minimum UVO exposure respectively. Current work focuses on achieving surface energy gradients on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone polymer that will be tuned to have mechanical properties similar to living tissues.

Categories

Engineering/Physical Science

Research Type

Research Assistant

Mentor Information

Dr. Nathan Gallant

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Surface Chemistry Gradient for Combinatorial Biomaterial Studies

A profound understanding of cell-material communications is imperative to progress in the field of tissue engineering. Manufacture of combinatorial biomaterials that enable high throughput data processing is an attractive proposal in this regard. The immediate focus is to obtain gradients in surface energy using ultraviolet-ozone-oxidation (UVO). Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of n-octyldimethylchlorosilane (ODMS) were obtained on plasma cleaned glass slides. Significant effort went toward developing a virtual instrument in LabVIEW that specifically modulated the extent of UVO of SAMs by controlling the movement of the linear motion of the sample beneath the lamp. Water contact angle was used to characterize the resulting surface energy gradient. Initially, ODMS rendered the surface of the glass hydrophobic as confirmed by contact angle measurement (102°). As the sample was accelerated under a slit aperture UVO lamp, dose dependent oxidation of the SAM correlated with changes in contact angle. Following UVO exposure, the substrate exhibited a gradient in surface energy spanning a range in contact angle of 50° (hydrophilic) to 102° (hydrophobic) corresponding to maximum and minimum UVO exposure respectively. Current work focuses on achieving surface energy gradients on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone polymer that will be tuned to have mechanical properties similar to living tissues.