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The National Cave and Karst Research Institute is pleased to publish Dr. Doug Kirkland’s monograph on the role of hydrogen sulfide on speleogenesis in the Guadalupe Mountains and western Delaware Basin. Dr. Kirkland’s work builds on his many years of research in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas, and provides the most comprehensive overview of cave and karst phenomena in the greater Delaware Basin region in almost 20 years. His work incorporates and summarizes decades of research by previous workers, combined with new ideas he has developed on speleogenesis in the Guadalupe Mountains. We feel confident that this publication will serve as an important source book and milestone for future research in the Delaware Basin region for many years to come.

Lewis Land
Managing Editor
February 19, 2014

ISBN

978-0-9910009-1-3

Publication Date

3-12-2014

Publisher

National Cave and Karst Research Institute

City

Carlsbad

Keywords

hydrogen sulfide, speleogenesis, Guadalupe Mountains, western Delaware Basin

Disciplines

Earth Sciences

Comments

Published and distributed by

National Cave and Karst Research Institute
Dr. George Veni, Executive Director
400-1 Cascades Ave.
Carlsbad, NM 88220 USA
www.nckri.org

Peer-review: Harvey DuChene, Carol Hill, Lewis Land, Arthur Palmer, Victor Polyak, and George Veni.

The citation information:
Kirkland, D.W. 2014. National Cave and Karst Research Institute Special Paper 2: Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Formation of Cave and Karst Phenomena in the Guadalupe Mountains and Western Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas. Carlsbad (NM): National Cave and Karst Research Institute.

ISBN 978-0-9910009-1-3

MANAGING EDITOR
Lewis Land
New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources
and the National Cave and Karst Research Institute

Produced with the assistance of the University of South Florida - Tampa Library.

Cover Photo: Rift in Left Hand Tunnel, Carlsbad Cavern, a long fissure with many loops and branches. At several places in the Cavern, such as this example, there are deep approximately linear rifts through which hydrogen sulfiderich water once rose. Aided by bacteria, the hydrogen sulfide reacted with oxygen derived from air to produce sulfuric acid. The floor of this passage, which is exactly the same elevation as nearby parts of the floor of the Big Room of Carlsbad Cavern, apparently represents a period of water table stability during one of the latest episodes of cavern enlargement (Palmer et al., 2009) (Photo by A.N. Palmer).

National Cave And Karst Research Institute Special Paper 2:  Role Of Hydrogen Sulfide In The Formation Of Cave And Karst Phenomena In The Guadalupe Mountains And Western Delaware Basin, New Mexico And Texas

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