Presentation Title (in English)

Japanese Cultural Tradition of Business

Presenter Information

Xuexin Liu, Spelman CollegeFollow

Abstract (250 words or less in English or 500 characters or less in Japanese)

This paper explores a new direction for teaching about Japan as a cross-cultural study. It discusses the leading questions: How can an introductory course be well designed for teaching how to do business and study abroad in Japan? How can the effective methodology be developed for engaging students in today’s global education? What materials and resources should be adopted for teaching and learning? How can the audio-visual and medium resources be appropriately used for teaching about business and Japanese cultural traditions? In order to answer these questions in a meaningful and explanatory way, we need to get first-hand information about learners’ interests and needs. This paper also discusses the importance of teaching business and cultural traditions through some comparative studies. For instance, it explains how to use medium resources and PowerPoint to demonstrate visual images about differences between doing business in Japan and the US how to raise questions about cross-cultural differences in social expectations for classroom discussions. In so doing, instructors can make teaching and learning interactively dynamic and keep students interested in particular topics and motivated for meaningful learning. This paper also offers some proposals for designing a particular course as part of the Asian Studies Program and developing the teaching materials to meet students’ real interests and needs. It attempts to explore the effective ways to increase students’ cross-cultural understanding and valuing of the similarities and differences between the East and the West and to develop their intercultural skills for doing business and study abroad in Japan. This paper offers some insightful inputs and suggestions.

Language

English

Start Date

10-2-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

10-2-2018 10:45 AM

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Feb 10th, 10:15 AM Feb 10th, 10:45 AM

Japanese Cultural Tradition of Business

This paper explores a new direction for teaching about Japan as a cross-cultural study. It discusses the leading questions: How can an introductory course be well designed for teaching how to do business and study abroad in Japan? How can the effective methodology be developed for engaging students in today’s global education? What materials and resources should be adopted for teaching and learning? How can the audio-visual and medium resources be appropriately used for teaching about business and Japanese cultural traditions? In order to answer these questions in a meaningful and explanatory way, we need to get first-hand information about learners’ interests and needs. This paper also discusses the importance of teaching business and cultural traditions through some comparative studies. For instance, it explains how to use medium resources and PowerPoint to demonstrate visual images about differences between doing business in Japan and the US how to raise questions about cross-cultural differences in social expectations for classroom discussions. In so doing, instructors can make teaching and learning interactively dynamic and keep students interested in particular topics and motivated for meaningful learning. This paper also offers some proposals for designing a particular course as part of the Asian Studies Program and developing the teaching materials to meet students’ real interests and needs. It attempts to explore the effective ways to increase students’ cross-cultural understanding and valuing of the similarities and differences between the East and the West and to develop their intercultural skills for doing business and study abroad in Japan. This paper offers some insightful inputs and suggestions.