Presentation Title (in English)

[COOPER 126] New Approach of Teaching Onomatopoeia in Japanese Language Classroom: Case Study of Introduction to Onomatopoeia Video by Seton Hall University DH Internship Project

Abstract (250 words or less in English or 500 characters or less in Japanese)

Vocabulary building has proven to be an essential part of learning any foreign languages. However, students are often limited to words that have introduced through only Japanese language textbooks and its teaching materials. According to the ATC21S, today’s curricula do not fully prepare students to live and work in an information-age society. One of the current problems with Japanese language education is the general absence of Onomatopoeia and effective teaching materials. Onomatopoeia has excluded in most Japanese language textbooks because it is difficult to teach and understand Onomatopoeia in the classroom setting alone. Therefore, this study propose new approach of teaching Onomatopoeia in Japanese language education. Current digital technology allows us portraying human gestures and sounds of expressions. In the spring 2016, Seton Hall University Digital Humanities (DH) Projects selected four graduate students from Japanese Studies and allowed them to create effective teaching materials. The finished product contains a 27-minute-long Onomatopoeia video, which reviews five categories of Onomatopoeia, its grammar, and usages. The video also contains about 60 Onomatopoeia words with images, sound, and meaning. (Please see, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCR1EJ2eeJA&t=17s). This video will be able to assist JSL students in high school as well as college students. This project contributes not only to deliver new resources and to methods of teaching, but also graduate students can learn how to utilize digital technology with corroboration with their colleagues. In conclusion, this Onomatopoeia project got ready the graduate students for their future leadership opportunities in the ever-expanding field of technology in Japanese language education.

Language

English

Location

Cooper Hall 126

Start Date

10-2-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

10-2-2018 11:15 AM

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Feb 10th, 10:45 AM Feb 10th, 11:15 AM

[COOPER 126] New Approach of Teaching Onomatopoeia in Japanese Language Classroom: Case Study of Introduction to Onomatopoeia Video by Seton Hall University DH Internship Project

Cooper Hall 126

Vocabulary building has proven to be an essential part of learning any foreign languages. However, students are often limited to words that have introduced through only Japanese language textbooks and its teaching materials. According to the ATC21S, today’s curricula do not fully prepare students to live and work in an information-age society. One of the current problems with Japanese language education is the general absence of Onomatopoeia and effective teaching materials. Onomatopoeia has excluded in most Japanese language textbooks because it is difficult to teach and understand Onomatopoeia in the classroom setting alone. Therefore, this study propose new approach of teaching Onomatopoeia in Japanese language education. Current digital technology allows us portraying human gestures and sounds of expressions. In the spring 2016, Seton Hall University Digital Humanities (DH) Projects selected four graduate students from Japanese Studies and allowed them to create effective teaching materials. The finished product contains a 27-minute-long Onomatopoeia video, which reviews five categories of Onomatopoeia, its grammar, and usages. The video also contains about 60 Onomatopoeia words with images, sound, and meaning. (Please see, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCR1EJ2eeJA&t=17s). This video will be able to assist JSL students in high school as well as college students. This project contributes not only to deliver new resources and to methods of teaching, but also graduate students can learn how to utilize digital technology with corroboration with their colleagues. In conclusion, this Onomatopoeia project got ready the graduate students for their future leadership opportunities in the ever-expanding field of technology in Japanese language education.