Title

The Impact of Fatherhood on Treatment Response for Men with Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Intimate Partner Violence

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

Keywords

domestic violence, alcohol dependence, fatherhood, parenting, treatment

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.3109/00952990.2010.535585

Abstract

Objective: The role of fathers in the lives of children has gained increasing attention over the last several decades, however, studies that specifically examine the parenting role among men who are alcohol dependent and have co-occurring intimate partner violence (IPV) have been limited. This brief report is intended to highlight the need to develop and focus interventions for men with co-occurring substance abuse and IPV with an emphasis on their roles as fathers. Method: Sixty-nine men who participated in a randomized comparison study of a coordinated substance abuse and domestic violence treatment program (SADV) and Twelve Step Facilitation (TSF) provided information about whether they were fathers. Analysis of covariance was used to assess the impact of fatherhood on the outcomes of intimate partner violence and alcohol use during the 12 weeks of treatment. Results: There was a significant interaction between type of treatment (SADV vs. TSF) and fatherhood. SADV resulted in significantly less IPV and use of alcohol over the 12 weeks of treatment than TSF for men without children. There were no significant differences between SADV and TSF for men who were fathers. Conclusion and Scientific Significance: Results indicate a need to further explore the role of fatherhood for men with co-occurring substance abuse and IPV and development of specialized treatments that may improve treatment outcomes for fathers.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

No

Citation / Publisher Attribution

American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, v. 37, issue 1, p. 74-78

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