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Abstract

Rail transit systems offer opportunities for travelers to avoid traffic congestion in large urban areas. This article explores the possibility of expanding access to existing rail transit systems through demand responsive shuttles. It examines demand for such an innovation in the San Francisco Bay Area where relatively good rail service already exists. Using survey data collected in a case study of one urban and one suburban neighborhood (N=800 individuals surveyed) served by the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit agency, this article investigates the influence of several factors on people’s willingness to use, pay for, and wait for the shuttles. The results indicate that a significant percentage of the surveyed population is willing to try the shuttle. Higher willingness to use the shuttle was associated with women, younger and elderly respondents, noncommuters who travel by SOV, and rail users who access the stations by transit. Higher willingness to pay for the shuttle was associated with suburbanites.

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/2375-0901.8.1.1

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