Proposal Title

How Do Second Language Speakers of English View ESL Learning Process?

Presenter Information

Maitham Al LamiFollow

Affiliation

Barry University

Department or Program

Curriculum and Instruction, Adrian Dominican School of Education

Start Date

15-4-2017 12:05 PM

End Date

15-4-2017 12:35 PM

Presentation Keywords/Areas

Humanities and Language(s)

Additional Presentation Keywords/Areas

Emerging trends in Qualitative Research

Additional Presentation Keywords/Areas

Socio-Cultural Theory

Abstract

Understanding the process of learning English as a second language (ESL) is a classic problem in the field of second language learning and education. The ongoing work in this line of research has produced an extensive body of literature that attempts to theoretically and empirically explain that process. However, despite the ample evidence that points to a multiplicity of constructs and models of ESL learning process, scholars are rarely explicit about the explanations ESL learners put forth to describe that process; and have not been in a position to classify and interpret those explanations. Therefore, of current interest is how adult speakers of English as a second language view the process of SLA. In this study, we aim at developing a taxonomy of these perceptions by applying such qualitative methods of inquiry as face-to-face interview. Specifically, we will adopt interpretive perspectives on what 25 adult participants believe to be the process in which an adult would optimally learn English as a second language.

Presentation Type and Comments

20-minute paper presentation

The presenter endeavors to highlight the importance of using qualitative research methodology to illuminate the views and perceptions regarding the process of learning English as a second language as seen and or experienced by second language speakers of English. The focus of the current paper are such views that are held by adult speakers of English as a second language whose native language is either Arabic or Spanish.

Guided by relevant theoretical framework involving qualitative methods of research, on the one hand, and the foundations of bilingualism and second language learning theory on the other, the presenter seeks to challenge the traditional research practices that are dominantly quantitative in nature. Additionally, well-organized qualitative research can illuminate new questions and provide opportunities to explore additional areas of interest. The qualitative examination of such highly subjective phenomenon as second language learning offers great potential to make contributions, both to our theoretical understanding of the process of second language learning of English and the sociocultural implications involved in studying the lived experiences of the participants. Constant comparison of participants’ responses will be resulting in emerging themes whose analysis is valuable to the investigation of the proposed questions of the study. At the end of the presentation, participants would be able to value the importance of applying qualitative methods of inquiry to the study of the phenomenon being examined.

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Apr 15th, 12:05 PM Apr 15th, 12:35 PM

How Do Second Language Speakers of English View ESL Learning Process?

Understanding the process of learning English as a second language (ESL) is a classic problem in the field of second language learning and education. The ongoing work in this line of research has produced an extensive body of literature that attempts to theoretically and empirically explain that process. However, despite the ample evidence that points to a multiplicity of constructs and models of ESL learning process, scholars are rarely explicit about the explanations ESL learners put forth to describe that process; and have not been in a position to classify and interpret those explanations. Therefore, of current interest is how adult speakers of English as a second language view the process of SLA. In this study, we aim at developing a taxonomy of these perceptions by applying such qualitative methods of inquiry as face-to-face interview. Specifically, we will adopt interpretive perspectives on what 25 adult participants believe to be the process in which an adult would optimally learn English as a second language.