Graduation Year

2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Ph.D.

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Degree Granting Department

Government and International Affairs

Major Professor

Steven Tauber, Ph.D.

Committee Member

John Large, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Jana Merrick, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Bernd Reiter, Ph.D.

Keywords

Cultural, Barriers, Treatment

Abstract

The long history of racism has created cultural barriers that prevent some Black Americans from seeking cancer treatment. Fatalism, physician mistrust, low levels of social support and self-efficacy, are the most cited cultural barriers in the literature. Black Americans’ religious beliefs and church involvement have historically helped them in their struggle against racism. A quantitative and a qualitative comparison studies examine the role of Black cancer survivors’ religious beliefs in their fight against cancer. The quantitative comparison study finds no difference in the cultural attitudes between Black and White cancer survivors. However, the qualitative comparison study between the same two racial groups finds Black survivors’ religion reduced their fatalism and increased their levels of physician trust, social support, and self-efficacy. The research concludes that Black Americans’ religion can mitigate cultural barriers that prevent some Black Americans from seeking cancer treatment.

Available for download on Thursday, December 14, 2017

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