Graduation Year

2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Ph.D.

Degree Name

Master of Urban & Reg Planning (M.U.R.P.)

Department

Electrical Engineering

Degree Granting Department

Electrical Engineering

Major Professor

Ravi Sankar, Ph.D.

Co-Major Professor

Thomas Weller, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Thomas Weller, Ph.D.

Committee Member

A. D. Snider, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Kandethody M. Ramachandran, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Rangachar Kasturi, Ph.D.

Keywords

Competition for Artificial Time Series, Convex Optimization, EUNITE, Mackey-Glass, Support Vector Regression

Abstract

Time series prediction techniques have been used in many real-world applications such as financial market prediction, electric utility load forecasting, weather and environmental state prediction, and reliability forecasting. The underlying system models and time series data generating processes are generally complex for these applications and the models for these systems are usually not known a priori. Accurate and unbiased estimation of time series data produced by these systems cannot always be achieved using well known linear techniques, and thus the estimation process requires more advanced time series prediction algorithms.

One type of time series interpolation and prediction algorithm that has been proven to be effective for these various types of applications is Support Vector Regression (SVR) [1], which is based on the Support Vector Machine (SVM) developed by Vapnik et al. [2, 3]. The underlying motivation for using SVMs is the ability of this methodology to accurately forecast time series data when the underlying system processes are typically nonlinear, non-stationary and not defined a-priori. SVMs have also been proven to outperform other non-linear techniques including neural-network based non-linear prediction techniques such as multi-layer perceptrons.

As with most time series prediction algorithms, there are typically challenges associated in applying a given heuristic to any general problem. One difficult challenge in using SVR to solve these types of problems is the selection of free parameters associated with the SVR algorithm. There is no given heuristic to select SVR free parameters and the user is left to adjust these parameters in an ad hoc manner.

The focus of this dissertation is to present an alternative to the typical ad hoc approach of tuning SVR for time series prediction problems by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to assist in the SVR free parameter selection process. Developed by Kennedy and Eberhart [4-8], PSO is a technique that emulates the process living creatures (such as birds or insects) use to discover food resources at a given geographic location. PSO has been proven to be an effective technique for many different kinds of optimization problems [9-11].

The focus of this dissertation is to present an alternative to the typical ad hoc approach of tuning SVR for time series prediction problems by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to assist in the SVR free parameter selection process. Developed by Kennedy and Eberhart [4-8], PSO is a technique that emulates the process living creatures (such as birds or insects) use to discover food resources at a given geographic location. PSO has been proven to be an effective technique for many different kinds of optimization problems [9-11].

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