Graduation Year

2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Ph.D.

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Psychology

Degree Granting Department

Psychology

Major Professor

Joseph Vandello, Ph.D.

Co-Major Professor

Jennifer K. Bosson, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Jennifer K. Bosson, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Jamie Goldenberg, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Sandra Schneider, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Mark Goldman, Ph.D.

Keywords

attributions, femininity, gender, masculinity, stereotypes

Abstract

Emerging research highlights the social penalties for men and women who commit cross-gendered behaviors. Here, I examine how and when two contextual mechanisms (competence and credentials) alter people's perceptions of cross-gendered behavior and render actors as less gender-atypical and more gender-typical. In Study 1, I tested the hypothesis that incompetence in cross-gendered behaviors would communicate same-gendered qualities by contrast. In Study 2, I tested the hypothesis that an actor who commits a cross-gendered behavior will receive less gender-inconsistent evaluations if they first demonstrate gender-typical traits. Moreover, Study 2 examines whether or not these credentialed actors change the perception of the behavior's alignment with conventional gender stereotypes. Results were largely mixed but generally failed to support hypotheses. The Discussion focuses on how future research can address these questions.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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