Graduation Year

2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Ph.D.

Degree Granting Department

Nursing

Major Professor

Mary Webb

Co-Major Professor

Mary E. Evans

Keywords

African-American Children, Immunizations, Vaccinations

Abstract

Rates and coverage levels of immunizations of African-American children are reduced compared to other races. Few studies have identified factors that influence vaccination decisions of African-American mothers. This study assessed the mothers' vaccination decisions using a self-administered questionnaire and a screening instrument for determining health literacy. This instrument is called Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). The sample was 92 African American mothers, recruited from a large metropolitan church in Jacksonville, Florida, who had at least one child under the age of seven. A cross-sectional research design was used to administer survey instruments to identify and interpret parental barriers and decision-making regarding childhood vaccination. The results of this study showed that the there was a decrease in scores across the levels of education which indicated that education had a significant impact on the parental perception for the vaccination of their children. Interventions can now be tailored to improve the childhood immunization rates and provide a foundation for developing effective childhood vaccination educational materials for this population.

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Nursing Commons

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