Graduation Year

2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

M.A.

Degree Granting Department

Psychology

Major Professor

Vicky Phares

Keywords

African American, Coparenting, Father, Psychological Well-Being, Resilience

Abstract

Objective. This study examined the factors associated with higher levels of paternal involvement among low-income, nonresidential, Black fathers. Method. Participants were 110 fathers of children up to the age of 10. Participants completed psychometrically sound measures of social support, spirituality, family of origin relationships, coparenting relationship quality, psychological well-being, motivation, conviction history, resilience, and father involvement. Results. A simultaneous multiple regression indicated that better psychological well-being and coparenting relationship quality and lower conviction rates since the birth of the child were significant predictors of higher levels of paternal involvement. Mediational analysis revealed that coparenting relationship quality partially mediated the relationship between psychological well-being and paternal involvement. Moderation analysis showed that social support moderated the relationship between psychological well-being and paternal involvement. Conclusions. This study provided evidence that several factors are related to higher levels of paternal involvement, specifically higher quality coparenting relationships and psychological well-being, more parenting-specific support from influential individuals, lower conviction rates since the birth of the child, and higher levels of resilience. The present study also illustrated the importance of examining disadvantaged fathers' strengths as targets for future interventions. Implications. Clinicians, social workers, program directors, and other individuals working with low-income, nonresidential, Black fathers should educate their clients on the factors associated with higher levels of paternal involvement as well as provide necessary resources to aid fathers to become more involved with their children.

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